Contrary To Popular Belief...

The facts you learned growing up, DEBUNKED!

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Cooties are the name of a type of lice. Lice are tiny, wingless, parasitic insects that live on warm-blooded animals, like humans. Only three types of lice feed on human blood:
Head lice, which burrow into the scalp of humans. Head lice is most commonly refered to as just “lice”
Crab lice, which attack the pelvic region, armpits and chest. Mostly referred to as “crabs”
Body lice, which spread Typhus Fever. Body lice are commonly referred to as “cooties.”
It is very easy for any type of lice to be passed from one person to another. The word cootie is thought to have come from the Malay word kutu, which means “a biting insect.”
Lice also attributes to other common phrases.
Louse- slang for “a bad person” but is also the singular term for lice. 
Nit-Picking- Head lice attach their eggs, called nits, to hairs with a gummy substance. Nit-picking originated from the tedious task of having to pick every nit from the head of a lice-infested person.
Nitwit- Originated from the false idea that head lice infested only poor, uneducated children.

Cooties are the name of a type of lice. Lice are tiny, wingless, parasitic insects that live on warm-blooded animals, like humans. Only three types of lice feed on human blood:

  1. Head lice, which burrow into the scalp of humans. Head lice is most commonly refered to as just “lice”
  2. Crab lice, which attack the pelvic region, armpits and chest. Mostly referred to as “crabs”
  3. Body lice, which spread Typhus Fever. Body lice are commonly referred to as “cooties.”

It is very easy for any type of lice to be passed from one person to another. The word cootie is thought to have come from the Malay word kutu, which means “a biting insect.”

Lice also attributes to other common phrases.

  • Louse- slang for “a bad person” but is also the singular term for lice.
  • Nit-Picking- Head lice attach their eggs, called nits, to hairs with a gummy substance. Nit-picking originated from the tedious task of having to pick every nit from the head of a lice-infested person.
  • Nitwit- Originated from the false idea that head lice infested only poor, uneducated children.

Filed under contrary to popular belief popular beliefs Lice Cooties Eww itchy head lice crabs

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Popular Belief: S.O.S. means “Save Our Ship” 
S.O.S. is the international Morse code signal for distress. S.O.S. actually is not an acronym for anything at all. The letter S is transmitted as three dots, while the letter O is transmitted as three dashes. S.O.S. was chosen as the distress signal because of how easy those letters are to transmit and understand.
If one could use a radio to call for distress, instead of Morse code, the international signal word is “Mayday.” Mayday is derived from the French word “m’aider” which means “help me”.

Popular Belief: S.O.S. means “Save Our Ship”

S.O.S. is the international Morse code signal for distress. S.O.S. actually is not an acronym for anything at all. The letter S is transmitted as three dots, while the letter O is transmitted as three dashes. S.O.S. was chosen as the distress signal because of how easy those letters are to transmit and understand.

If one could use a radio to call for distress, instead of Morse code, the international signal word is “Mayday.” Mayday is derived from the French word “m’aider” which means “help me”.

Filed under contrary to popular belief popular belief French SOS ships distress interesting facts

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 Popular Belief: Twitter is a new concept, that was made for our generation. 
Twitter is used to send out messages to your friends/followers, to inform them of what you are doing, how you are feeling, etc. Now, most posts on Twitter are along the lines of “Chillin at da crib with John and Sam, hit up da cell 555-1234.” But when it started it was a lace to keep people updated on your whereabouts and activities. 
This article describes a Twitter-like system that was in London in 1935. The article reads:

TO AID persons who wish to make or cancel appointments or inform  friends of their whereabouts, a robot message carrier has been  introduced in London, England. Known as the “notificator,” the new  machine is installed in streets, stores, railroad stations or other  public places where individuals may leave messages for friends.
The user walks up on a small platform in front of the machine,  writes a brief message on a continuous strip of paper and drops a coin  in the slot. The inscription moves up behind a glass panel where it  remains in public view for at least two hours so that the person for  whom it is intended may have sufficient time to observe the note at the  appointed place. The machine is similar in appearance to a candy-vending device.

Popular Belief: Twitter is a new concept, that was made for our generation.

Twitter is used to send out messages to your friends/followers, to inform them of what you are doing, how you are feeling, etc. Now, most posts on Twitter are along the lines of “Chillin at da crib with John and Sam, hit up da cell 555-1234.” But when it started it was a lace to keep people updated on your whereabouts and activities. 

This article describes a Twitter-like system that was in London in 1935. The article reads:

TO AID persons who wish to make or cancel appointments or inform friends of their whereabouts, a robot message carrier has been introduced in London, England. Known as the “notificator,” the new machine is installed in streets, stores, railroad stations or other public places where individuals may leave messages for friends.

The user walks up on a small platform in front of the machine, writes a brief message on a continuous strip of paper and drops a coin in the slot. The inscription moves up behind a glass panel where it remains in public view for at least two hours so that the person for whom it is intended may have sufficient time to observe the note at the appointed place. The machine is similar in appearance to a candy-vending device.


Filed under twitter notificator Contrary to popular belief popular beliefs

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SO SORRY

I forgot about this blog.

I’ve been swamped with schoolwork, but Finals are this week and next, and after that, I will be back to posting 2-3 times a day!

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 Popular Belief: ALL murders are documented and accurate numbers can be accessed by citizens. 
Most people believe that when cities, townships, states, etc. release their annual crime data, that everything is on it, especially murders. That would be nice, wouldn’t it?The numbers released are always bigger than anybody ever wants them to be, but they are not accurate. When a murder goes into the crime reports sometimes there are double, triple, quad, etc. murders that get reported as one.
Example:: (I’ll use Chicago since I grew up there)
Let’s pretend that on the Southside of Chicago, a triple homicide occurs. One building, a mom, a dad, and a teenager. They are all murdered, so to a normal citizen this would count as three deaths, three murders, right? Makes sense, but this is not how the officials think about it. They would report this as a triple homicide, but in annual reports, it would only count as 1.
This is how many large cities try to keep their homicide numbers down. Saying you have 1 homicide looks a lot better than admitting you have 3 bodies.
\personal\Sorry for the “morbid” topic being my first when I came back. I just remembered it being talked about in one of my classes, and I just got questioned by police due to a shooting that just happened in my alley.

Popular Belief: ALL murders are documented and accurate numbers can be accessed by citizens.

Most people believe that when cities, townships, states, etc. release their annual crime data, that everything is on it, especially murders. That would be nice, wouldn’t it?
The numbers released are always bigger than anybody ever wants them to be, but they are not accurate. When a murder goes into the crime reports sometimes there are double, triple, quad, etc. murders that get reported as one.

Example:: (I’ll use Chicago since I grew up there)

Let’s pretend that on the Southside of Chicago, a triple homicide occurs. One building, a mom, a dad, and a teenager. They are all murdered, so to a normal citizen this would count as three deaths, three murders, right? Makes sense, but this is not how the officials think about it. They would report this as a triple homicide, but in annual reports, it would only count as 1.

This is how many large cities try to keep their homicide numbers down. Saying you have 1 homicide looks a lot better than admitting you have 3 bodies.

\personal\
Sorry for the “morbid” topic being my first when I came back. I just remembered it being talked about in one of my classes, and I just got questioned by police due to a shooting that just happened in my alley.

Filed under contrary to popular belief popular belief fact vs. fiction shooting chicago some personal

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Lack of posting…

I am sorry for the lack of posts in the past few days. I had friends over on Friday/Saturday, and my parents took me out to eat yesterday for my birthday, which is today.

I am officially no longer a teenager.

And I will not be posting today, I leave in 5 minutes for class, and don’t get home until almost 10PM. But I promise I will resume posting tomorrow, and I’ll post extra. And I’ll try to fill the queue. The stuff I put in queues never post when I want them too, so I’ll figure that out.

Thanks :)

Filed under personal birthday I'm 20

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unique-ink-deactivated20110618 asked: This isn't a question but more along the lines of a statement. I really like that you post facts becuase I do too, only difference is I get my from omg-facts.com (I'm lazy) but yea....keep up the good work

:) Thanks.

I love omg-facts and the entire Spartz Network.

Most of mine are things I find in my school books, my old notes, my “Fact or Crap” daily calender or in this other book my brother bought me that has random facts.

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 Popular Belief: The Brothers Grimm wrote Grimm’s Fairy Tales
Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm did not write any of Grimm’s Fairy Tales, nor was the book originally called Grimm’s Fairy Tales. The brothers complied the traditional fairy tales from previously published collections and by recording folklore told by peasants.
The stories they collected, they published in a book in 1812 Germany,  which they called Kinder- und Hausmarrchen which translates to “Tales of Home and Children”. When the book was translated into English, it was then given the title Grimm’s Fairy Tales

Popular Belief: The Brothers Grimm wrote Grimm’s Fairy Tales

Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm did not write any of Grimm’s Fairy Tales, nor was the book originally called Grimm’s Fairy Tales. The brothers complied the traditional fairy tales from previously published collections and by recording folklore told by peasants.

The stories they collected, they published in a book in 1812 Germany,  which they called Kinder- und Hausmarrchen which translates to “Tales of Home and Children”. When the book was translated into English, it was then given the title Grimm’s Fairy Tales

Filed under Grimm's fairy tales brothers grimm stories fairy tales folklore contrary to popular belief fact vs. fiction popular belief

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 Popular Belief: Never Never Land is from Peter Pan. 
Never Never Land is Australian slang for the Australian outback, stemming from visitors vowing to “never never” return. The outback is vast and desolate which is a big contributing factor to visitors not wanting to go back. Never Never Land was in a book, however it was not Peter Pan. The book, written in 1908, was titled We of the Never Never written by Aeneas Gunn. The book helped the outback southeast of Darwin, Australia to be known as Never Never Land.
Peter Pan premiered in London in 1904, in the play Peter Pan has adventures in Neverland, not Never Never Land. All adaptions, including the book version and Walt Disney’s version, show Peter Pan’s adventures in Neverland.
For years people have been using Neverland and Never Never Land interchangeably, even though they are completely different. Never Never Land actually exists.
{Neverland exists too, it’s Micheal Jackson’s ranch. But I’m sure it’s easier to visit Never Never Land than it is to visit the Neverland Ranch}

Popular Belief: Never Never Land is from Peter Pan.

Never Never Land is Australian slang for the Australian outback, stemming from visitors vowing to “never never” return. The outback is vast and desolate which is a big contributing factor to visitors not wanting to go back. Never Never Land was in a book, however it was not Peter Pan. The book, written in 1908, was titled We of the Never Never written by Aeneas Gunn. The book helped the outback southeast of Darwin, Australia to be known as Never Never Land.

Peter Pan premiered in London in 1904, in the play Peter Pan has adventures in Neverland, not Never Never Land. All adaptions, including the book version and Walt Disney’s version, show Peter Pan’s adventures in Neverland.

For years people have been using Neverland and Never Never Land interchangeably, even though they are completely different. Never Never Land actually exists.

{Neverland exists too, it’s Micheal Jackson’s ranch. But I’m sure it’s easier to visit Never Never Land than it is to visit the Neverland Ranch}

Filed under Peter Pan Wendy NeverLand Never Never land Disney Micheal Jackson Neverland ranch Australia popular beliefs Contrary to popular belief fact vs. fiction

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 Popular Belief: The first shots of the Civil War(USA) were shot at Fort Sumter 
In 1860, South Carolina prepared to gain control of federal government forts in Charleston Harbor after the state seceded from the Union. South Carolina started their ‘fighting’ on January 9, 1861 when they had a battery of Confederate soldiers on Morris Island fire 17 shots at the Star of the West. The Star of the West was a Union steamship headed to Fort Sumter with supplies. It was not until 3 months later that the Confederate army fired on Fort Sumter, on April 12, 1861.

Popular Belief: The first shots of the Civil War(USA) were shot at Fort Sumter

In 1860, South Carolina prepared to gain control of federal government forts in Charleston Harbor after the state seceded from the Union. South Carolina started their ‘fighting’ on January 9, 1861 when they had a battery of Confederate soldiers on Morris Island fire 17 shots at the Star of the West. The Star of the West was a Union steamship headed to Fort Sumter with supplies. It was not until 3 months later that the Confederate army fired on Fort Sumter, on April 12, 1861.

Filed under civil war fort sumter first shots south carolina USA fact vs. fiction popular beliefs Contrary to popular belief